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Welcome to The Cycle Conservation Club of Michigan!

The Cycle Conservation Club of Michigan is a non-profit organization committed to the conservation of our wild lands while promoting the sport of off-road motorcycling. During the riding season, organized “trail tours” are held at various locations throughout the trail system in the northern part of the state. In addition, The Cycle Conservation Club of Michigan sponsors the “Ultimate Trail Ride” – the Michael R. Burlingham Memorial Six Days of Michigan. Six full days of off-road riding – there’s no other ride like it anywhere in the world!

Your membership in The Cycle Conservation Club of Michigan includes a one year subscription to the Great Lakes TrailRider Magazine, a detailed electronic ORV map listing (on CD or flash drive) of the Michigan trail system, access to all CCC events and activities plus access to the members' section of this website. To join, simply click here, follow the link above, or contact the CCC office at 517-416-0126.

Legislation to expand ORV use on state-managed forest roads goes into effect at end of 2017, 2018

Revised Rules Will Follow Lower Peninsula Trail Inventory Process

With fall hunting seasons in full swing, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources reminds off-road vehicle enthusiasts that while the expansion of ORV riding opportunities on state-managed forest roads in the Lower Peninsula is in the works, the new rules won’t go into effect until 2017 and 2018 – after the completion of a statewide inventory of forest roads.
The inventory will include the mapping of five regions, including four in the Lower Peninsula. The Upper Peninsula serves as one region and already allows ORV use on most state forest roads.

On Sept. 28, Gov. Rick Snyder signed Public Act 288 of 2016. The approved legislation sets forth a timeline for the new rules to go into effect. This includes examination of the two northernmost regions in the Lower Peninsula by the end of 2017 and the remaining regions by the end of 2018. This review will allow the DNR to determine which forest roads should remain closed and which roads will be open for ORV use.

State-managed forest roads in the Upper Peninsula currently are open to ORV use unless closed by the DNR. The law has been the opposite in the Lower Peninsula, where state forest roads are closed to ORV use unless posted as open. 
“This bill is a step toward building a more unified approach to ORV regulations by making the rules in the Lower Peninsula align with those in the U.P.,” said Bill O’Neill, chief of the DNR Forest Resources Division. “By closely reviewing these areas before opening them to ORV use, the DNR – in cooperation with the public – has the opportunity to make science-based decisions that ensure sensitive areas in our state forests remain protected, while offering access to Michigan’s quality trails network.” 

O’Neill, who also serves as state forester for Michigan, said those special areas will include wetlands, vernal pools and other critical habitats in the state forest system.    

"The DNR will be proactive in identifying the Lower Peninsula state forest roads that will be opened up for ORV use," said Ron Olson, chief of the DNR Parks and Recreation Division. “We are excited about the expansion of ORV use on forest roads, so we can build on the extensive trail system that already exists and attract even more ORV enthusiasts from near and far." 
As DNR staff completes the preliminary road inventory and mapping processes, the recommendations will be available for public input. The maps of state forest roads available for ORV use will be posted annually for the public. Local units of government will receive notification of new restrictions placed on roads or trails accessing public land.

Use of ORVs and Pack or Saddle Animals for Game Retrieval


In addition to the opening of state forest roads, Public Act 288 also reinstates the use of ORVs and pack or saddle animals for retrieval of harvested deer, bear and elk on state-managed public lands on which hunting is permitted.
The new law allows an individual to leave a designated ORV or pack-and-saddle trail to retrieve harvested deer, bear and elk by using the most direct route that does not enter a stream, river or wetland except over a bridge, culvert or similar structure. ORVs being utilized for the retrieval of game cannot travel more than 5 mph when they are off the designated trail. This new law does not allow pack-and-saddle animals or ORVs to be used for hunting or otherwise traversing state-managed land.

Custom CCC Riding Jersies Now Available

Looking for a great gift for the off-road rider in your house? The Cycle Conservation Club of Michigan has partnered with Fly Racing, one of the top brands of purpose-built riding gear and accessories in the industry to offer custom imprinted riding jersies! The jersies are black polyester with whit trim and feature a large CCC logo screen printed on the back. Click here for pics and details!

DNR Announces New ORV Route in UP

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources has opened a new ORV route between Ishpeming and Republic in Marquette County. The DNR, in conjunction with the Iron Ore Heritage Recreation Authority, will host a ribbon-cutting ceremony at 10 a.m. Tuesday, May 19, at the intersection of Stoneville Road and the Ishpeming to Republic ORV Route in Tilden Township. The DNR and Iron Ore Heritage Recreation Authority invite all trail lovers to attend the ceremony and discover this new Upper Peninsula recreation opportunity.

The Iron Ore Heritage Trail and the DNR have successfully worked together on the development of many miles of hiking and biking trails in Marquette County. This new ORV route continues that tradition of collaboration, with the eventual goal of linking Negaunee and Gwinn into this route.

“There are many partners in making these trails become reality," said Carol Fulsher, administrator of the Iron Ore Heritage Recreation Authority. "We would like to thank the Moose Country Snowmobile Club for spending the time and money in fixing the bridges along this route and allowing it to be open year-round."

This new ORV route is 19 miles long and connects the communities of Ishpeming, Clarksburg, Humboldt and Republic. It is restricted to vehicles 65 inches in width or smaller. The ORV route also is open to hiking, biking and equestrian and snowmobile use.

Sharing Our Trails

For a complete guide to trail etiquette in Michigan, click here.

This website and all content herein © copyright 2016 by The Cycle Conservation Club of Michigan. All rights reserved. No material may be reproduced, distributed, modified or reposted to other websites without the express written permission of The Cycle Conservation Club of Michigan.


Updates

11-30-16 Posted the December issue of Great Lakes TrailRider Magazine in the members' section. Updated home page. Posted Member Marketplace ads for December.


 
News & Announcements

12-01-16 Check out the updated 2017 CCC Calendar of Events under the Events tab of this site!